Strength To Weight Ratio To Improve A Lacrosse Athlete

Strength To Weight Ratio To Improve A Lacrosse Athlete

One of the key fundamentals for improving athletic and ultimately lacrosse performance is improving an athlete’s strength to weight ratio. That means that you work to cut any unnecessary body fat from your physique and choose a training program that makes you as strong and explosive as possible.

This concept is very similar to how most formula one race car engineers think when designing their automobiles. More power and less drag equals higher speed and more efficiency. That requires an expertise in finding the right alloy for the chassis and strong enough yet light enough metal for the engine.

This can be a real juggling act and requires a keen eye for adjustment.

When exercising it’s important to monitor how you are improving in all areas like weight lifting, running and the performance of your favorite physical activity.

These numbers need to be monitored in relationship to your body-fat and bodyweight weekly. Abnormal changes in any of these numbers may require a look at diet, rest and your training program.

For example if you are not getting stronger and increasing your ability to do more quality work in your exercise session you may need to eat a few more calories or focus on stretching and recovery methods like taking a Jacuzzi or getting more rest.

Strength To Weight RatioFor The Lacrosse Athlete

The concept is simple for sports training in lacrosse. We want an athlete to be as strong, lean and healthy as possible to have the stamina to perform their sport at a high level. Remember there is no sense in losing weight if it will adversely affect your ability to be as athletic as possible. Athletic performance is the main focus.

We want to achieve an optimal balance of body fat level, body weight and strength that works best for each athlete. Sacrificing one for another will disturb the balance needed for optimal performance.

The goal is to feel, look and perform your best.

Let’s use the analogy of a racecar to explain strength to weight ratio. Say the car has a 2000 lb. chassis and a 400 horsepower engine to begin with.

If the engineering team can make the chassis 1500 lbs. (lower body fat) with the same strength to hold the car together and then put in a 500 horsepower engine (increase strength through resistance training) the strength to weight ratio will improve. The car can now apply more force with less drag and that leads to better performance (speed, explosiveness and endurance).

For the athlete that means it’s easier to perform all their necessary athletic drills.

Body-fat levels are improved by following a combination of diet and sports fitness training. The diet should consist of calorie/gram control, low glycemic carbohydrates, quality proteins and unsaturated fats. Sports fitness training should be an all encompassing combination of systematic resistance training, speed and agility training, flexibility work, massage, chiropractic (if necessary) and sport specific training.

When training it’s important to monitor how an athlete is improving in all areas like weight lifting, running and the performance their actual sport.

These numbers need to be monitored in relationship to your body-fat and bodyweight weekly. Abnormal changes in any of these numbers may require a look at diet, rest and the training program.

For example if, no progress is made by  getting stronger and increasing your ability to do more quality work in your training session the overall program may need to be adjusted with a focus on eating a few more calories or focusing on stretching and recovery methods like taking a Jacuzzi or getting more rest.

 

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